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"Heritage Talks Online 2022-2023" presents:

February 2, 2023, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

"Cotton makes a colony: Valleyfield’s English roots," with Ken Dolphin

larger_4_0.pngThousands of skilled labourers and their families from Lancashire, England first came to Quebec as employees of the Montreal Cottons Factory, greatly influencing the future social, economic, and cultural development of Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. The Valleyfield mill colony, established in 1875, was itself a model of 19th century industrial production at a time when companies exercised tremendous control over the lives of their workers, from where they lived and socialized, to the types of products they bought with their wages.

Châteauguay Valley Historical Society president Ken Dolphin revisits Valleyfield and the thousands of British subjects who populated the industrial settlement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Join us for a virtual tour and local history of this iconic textile town and learn why Valleyfield homes were among the first in the province to be furnished with electricity.

Registration for this video presentation is required. You must sign in here to join the Zoom call.

A public livestream (no registration needed) of this presentation will be broadcast on www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada/

About our speaker:
Born in Valleyfield, Ken Dolphin devoted his working career to special education, teaching in elementary schools throughout the Chateauguay Valley, while pursuing an interest in writing and community service. Author of several published children’s books and short novels, Ken has also served as town councillor, president of the local soccer club and vice-president of the local minor hockey league. Ken gives guided walks through the old cotton-mill neighbourhood to students of industrialization.

To view the entire 2022-2023 Heritage Talks program, click here!

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"Heritage Talks Online 2022-2023" presents:

February 09, 2023, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

"Dead or Alive? The pulse of heritage in today’s Laurentians," with Joseph Graham

larger_5.pngThe farmer feels his heartstrings tug driving past an abandoned farm, the barn collapsed and the old house sagging; the angler cherishes an old photo of her grandfather holding a huge trout caught in a river where no fish live today; a forester sees in a tree stump the white pine forest that once covered rolling hills from the Atlantic coast to the Great Lakes.

Why do people seek to preserve historic artefacts and places? Is this desire a sign of people’s appreciation for their ancestors? Or is it a type of nostalgia, recalling how society has changed, perhaps a warning against changes that happen too fast? Author and historian Joseph Graham starts his enquiry in the old Argenteuil Seigneurie, where local history illustrates the challenges of saving heritage when the cultures and beliefs that give heritage meaning change or cease to exist. Centred in a Scottish-influenced farming settlement long called St. Andrew’s East, the community was renamed St. André d’Argenteuil as the English-speaking population declined. The seigneurie offers fertile ground for exploring the long, complicated genesis of identity formation in the surrounding region, including how it came to be known as The Laurentians.

Registration for this Zoom event is required. Please sign in here to join.

A public livestream will be also be broadcast on www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada/

About our speaker:
Joseph Graham has been a frequent contributor and columnist with Quebec Heritage News magazine for more than 20 years. He is author of Naming the Laurentians, A history of Place names ‘up-north’ and Insatiable Hunger, Colonial Encounters in Context.

To view the entire 2022-2023 Heritage Talks program, click here!

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Scandal Makers Film Fest 2023
A presentation by the Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network (QAHN)
Sunday February 12, 2023
1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Uplands Cultural and Heritage Centre, 9 Speid, Sherbrooke, Qc

Featuring curious and infamous stories from cemeteries in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, the Mauricie and Centre-du-Québec regions.

Meet special guests François Roy, Julie Miller, Heather Darch, Grant Myers and Anne Leydet.

Enjoy traditional refreshments served by Uplands Cultural Centre.

Admission is Free. But seating at Uplands is limited, so reservations are required! To reserve your seat, please contact QAHN at [email protected] or by calling the office at 819-564-9595.

For viewers who would prefer to participate from the comfort of their own homes, this event will also be livestreamed at www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada.

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"Heritage Talks Online 2022-2023" presents:

February 16, 2023, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
"The St. Lawrence Waterway Project: From Colonial Canals to the Seaway," with Mark Gallop

larger_6_2.pngThe 1959 opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway as “the world’s longest inland deep draft marine highway” forever changed Quebec’s geographic, economic, and political landscapes. It was one of the great engineering projects of the 20th century, displacing more than twice as much earth as the building of the Suez Canal did a century before. But the Seaway was not just a post-war initiative. Inter-governmental discussions for the “St. Lawrence Waterway Project” dated back as far as the 1890s. The desire to access the interior of the North American continent with ocean-going vessels started centuries earlier. In 1689 François Dollier de Casson, a Sulpician priest, was the first to start digging to circumvent the Lachine Rapids. With a focus on both geography and biography, this tale will be told through the diverse and driven personalities who worked to reshape the rivers and lakes of Quebec and beyond for navigation.

Registration for this online lecture is required. You must sign in here to join the Zoom call.

A public livestream (no registration needed) of this presentation will also be broadcast simultaneously on www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada/

About our speaker:
Mark Gallop spent three decades in the investment and financial services sector, and now devotes his time to historical research, writing, and lecturing. He is a Trustee of the Mount Royal Cemetery, a past President of the Atwater Library, and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. He divides his time between New Brunswick and Quebec.

To view the entire 2022-2023 Heritage Talks program, click here!

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"Heritage Talks Online 2022-2023" presents:

March 2, 2023, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

"Becoming Modern: The Rise of Annual Art Exhibitions in Montreal, 1860-1880," with Lorne Huston

larger_7.pngCanada’s modern art world can trace its origins to Montreal in the second half of the 19th century. Before 1850, well-defined occupations of artist, dealer and critic didn’t exist, and the buying and collecting of paintings was largely considered a foreign pursuit. By 1900, though, the city was host to an annual exhibition featuring contemporary works by professional artists, many of whom were Canadian-born and trained. People visited these shows by the thousands and newspapers give them prominent coverage.

The founding of the Art Association of Montreal in 1860 marks a turning point in the process of art institutionalization that was occurring all over Europe and North America. How did this process occur in Montreal, compared with other industrial cities? Who were the Art Association’s leading figures and why did it take 20 years to realize their goal of holding an annual art show? Join historian Lorne Huston as he delves into this emerging world of modern art before the railroad barons made their influence felt.

Registration for this video presentation is required. You must sign in here to join the Zoom call.

A public livestream (no registration needed) of this presentation will also be broadcast simultaneously on www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada/

About our speaker:
Lorne Huston taught at Cégep Édouard-Montpetit in Longueuil. He specializes in the history of the arts sector in English Montreal. His recent publications include George M. Brewer et le milieu culturel anglophone montréalais 1900-1950, (Éditions Septentrion: 2020), co-authored with Mare-Thérèse Lefebvre. He has previously written on the Art Association, anglophone theatre, and on art and drama criticism in Montreal during the period 1900-1950.

To view the entire 2022-2023 Heritage Talks program, click here!

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"Heritage Talks Online 2022-2023" presents:

March 09, 2023, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

"Behind the Scenes: Betty Riley, Black voices, and media activism in the 1970s," with Desirée Rochat

larger_8.pngThe early 1970s was an important period of social change in Montreal’s Black communities. New organizations were being formed, adding to the city’s older Black institutions, founded in the early 20th century. This made for a vibrant scene of cultural, educational, and political activism, led by a wide array of community members. Equally important, but often overlooked, is the role that communication activism played during these years. Through various media, Black leaders strove to ensure that information was widely circulated in their communities and that Black voices could be heard. One of the leaders of this movement was Betty Riley. While working as an office supervisor at the Montreal company, Cable T.V.L., Miss Riley realized that most television programming did not reflect the realities or meet the needs of the city’s Black residents. In 1971, Betty Riley took it upon herself to create the first-ever Canadian TV show devoted to Black communities. In so doing, she became one of the country’s rare female television producers, marking the beginning of her pioneering career in community-based communication.

Registration for this video presentation is required. You must sign in here to join the Zoom call.

A public livestream (no registration needed) of this presentation will also be broadcast simultaneously on www.facebook.com/QAHNCanada/

About our speaker:
Désirée Rochat is a community educator and researcher. She holds a PhD in Educational Studies from McGill University. Guided by an approach connecting historical research, community archival preservation and education, her work aims to document and transmit (hi)stories of Black communities’ activism. Rochat is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of Toronto.

To view the entire 2022-2023 Heritage Talks program, click here!